Top 20 Logos That Use Visual Puns

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A pun is a play-on-words; you can derive more than one meaning from a single word or phrase. And boy do I LOVE them. They are hands down my favorite form of humour. ‘Camping is intense/in tents’ is my all time favorite. ‘Nacho/not yo cheese’ is a classic. ‘Did you hear about the new pirate movie? It’s rated arrrrrrr.’

Are most puns kind of silly? Yes. But for me, they are still indisputably clever.

This deep love and appreciation for puns stems neatly into graphic design. Many of my favorite designs make use of visual puns: you can derive more than one meaning from a single symbol or image. I find visual puns particularly effective in logo design.

Here are 20 of my favs:

FedEx: The most famous visual pun can be found in FedEx. Do you see how the space between the uppercase E and the…

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Banksy Plays the Violin

The Hipping Post

Banksy

Earlier this year, I read an article about Joshua Bell, a violinist who played at a Washington D.C. subway station during the morning rush hour. Unlike most buskers, this musician was one of the most accomplished virtuosos in the world. Three nights before, Joshua Bell played in Boston’s Symphony Hall for patrons who paid over $100 a ticket. And the instrument he played? A violin from 1713, handcrafted by Antonio Stradivari, that cost Bell $3.5 million.

You would expect that one of the best musicians on the planet to garner some attention. But during his 43 minutes of playing time, only seven people stopped to listen, and he earned a total of $32.17.

This experiment, the brainchild of The Washington Post, raises all sorts of questions, including: Can we appreciate beauty in unfamiliar settings? Are we able to recognize talent without signposts? And how do we know when we…

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Fore

In my opinion, the beauty of this lies in the truth. It’s in the unabashed honesty, and the pure and simple stating of the impossibly complex.

It Can Always Change

We’ll look back and we’ll

Hold so tight

These moments

The ones we don’t force

The ones where we can’t pretend

The times where we lived

And we didn’t know

What we were doing

Or where we were going

It was to far off

But we aspired

and we had goals

And although they weren’t always in sight

They were always in mind

As we trailed,

And we failed

And we learned

About the difference

Between what we wanted

And what we thought we did

Things we thought were forsure

But they never really were

Nothing ever is

nothing ever was

and we weren’t aware

and we’re not now

it feels the same,

but its all so different

we never noticed

then we did.

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Ads of the World™ | Creative Advertising Archive & Community

Ads of the World™ | Creative Advertising Archive & Community

This is an amazing resource.  Ads of the World is website described as an advertising archive and community  that shows creative campaigns daily from around the world. It’s worth checking out if you’re interested in advertising, graphic design, visual communication, ect. 

To This Day

To This Day is a project based on the poem “To This Day” by spoken word artist, Shane Koyczan. It was created to explore the extensive and continual effects that bullying has on an individual.

The video is powerful, to say the least. I found it to be captivating, thought-provoking, and inspirational.

Though We May Never Need The Light

Persephone's Girlhood:

No one knows we sleep under a cheese moon. The stars keep falling, but I don’t mind so much. I pick them up and put them in your pocket — anything to keep on touching  you.

So when the moon grows thick patches of black and blue, and when the sky is nothing but an eye shut tight, you’ll pull them out one by one — those stars — and I’ll use their light to read you back to sleep.

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Things real people don’t say about advertising (23 photos)

theCHIVE


Check out tpdsaa.tumblr.com -dedicated to Things real people don’t say about advertising and submit your own stock photo with snarky headline

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